Your Dry Cleaning Could be the New Carcinogen in Your Life » EcoClean Austin TX

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May 23

Your Dry Cleaning Could be the New Carcinogen in Your Life

We were not kidding when we said that PERC- the harmful chemical that “85% of U.S commercial dry cleaners use” is bad for you. Still don’t believe us? Go look at the final health assessment The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released on PERC, or the chemical also known as tetrachloroethylene. The one thing that pops out to everyone who reads the report is that perc is now a “likely” carcinogen. This is not good news to anyone who uses traditional dry cleaners to clean their clothes, or for anyone on the planet for that matter.

The EPA has noted that their investigations on the perc chemical was extensive and elaborate, especially regarding their research on the chemical’s potential to cause cancer. In their study, they found rats and mice to develop various types of cancer when they inhaled or ingested the perc chemical. The agency also conducted studies on various workers in the laundry and dry cleaning industry and found that “perc exposure is associated with elevated risks of certain types of cancer.” This new characteristic of perc is not something to dismiss if you go to a traditional commercial dry cleaner because odds are, they are using this dangerous chemical on your clothes!

At EcoClean, we’re different from traditional drycleaners. We are PERC FREE because we like to clean your clothes in the best way we can.  It is healthier for you, your clothes, and the planet! We want everyone in our community to be healthier and smarter when they choose who does their dry cleaning. At EcoClean, we choose to clean your clothes without using any trace of the carcinogen through a process called wet cleaning. Wet cleaning simply eliminates the entire risk of perc contaminating groundwater. Wet cleaning is also better for your clothes as well as more energy efficient than traditional dry cleaning methods. Why choose to clean your clothes with perc when there are healthier and safer methods to get the job done?

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachloroethylene

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